Friday, May 22, 2020

The Monsters And Their Origin - 1412 Words

Monster Stephen T. Asma has given an analysis of the monsters and their origin. Besides, he gives a definition on the fears of human beings regarding the monsters. The prejudices and fears date back to prehistory and the developments in evolution that have occurred throughout in humanity. The prehistory gives an account of the concerns that people have in today s world. The author uses the term monster to describe myths and physical deformities. Stephen Asma uses the term to describe that there are fears in the post-modern and advanced world of technology (11). Stephen T. Asma has satisfactorily achieved the goal of defining monsters. The monsters have changed, and there are numerous functions that they have served in the society. Additionally, the monsters will take various form in the future. Asma gives a reason for the existence of monsters in all societies and how the monsters help individuals to cope with life. The significance of monsters in the culture has transformed from most societies from polytheism to monotheism. Furthermore, the community has received increased enlightenment through improvements in science and technology. In his book, Asma identifies some of the fears that the future hold. The monsters have applied a captivation in the minds of human beings for centuries. However, most of the monsters are either real and literal or imagined and metaphorical. In the book, Asma suggests ways of handling the monsters through managing ambiguity, uncertainty, andShow MoreRelatedA Plan for a Research on The Origins of the Loch Ness M onster619 Words   |  3 Pages For my research paper, I’m going to research the Loch Ness monster, specifically the origins of the legends and the impact they’ve made. I’ll tie in other legends from around the world, including the Mokà ¨là ©-mbà ¨mbà © of Africa, and Utah’s very own Bear Lake monster. I might also mention the world’s fascination with supernatural things if it doesn’t stray too far from my topic. It’s very interesting to think about where the legends came from and why people believe them. I also wonder if there is someRead MoreFrankenstein Biblical Allusions Essay1293 Words   |  6 Pagesthe Monster to stay in his life, as Adam and Eve stayed in the Garden of Eden, but abandons the monster directly following its animation. The abandonment significantly affects the monster psychology and thus, determines some of his proceeding actions. The absence of an origin story for the monster creates a struggle for identity, as the monster inhabits characteristics of Adam, Satan, and Cain, thus confirming the necessity for humans to have a parental connection. The absence of an origin storyRead MoreThe Story Of Echidna. Fast Facts†¨. Pronunciation: . Origin:870 Words   |  4 PagesThe Story of Echidna Fast Facts†¨ Pronunciation: Origin: Greek Home: Phrygia, Tartarus Role: Guardian of Earth’s Treasures, Mother of All Monsters Parents: Gaia and Tartarus, or Keto and Phorkys Spouse: Typhon Children: Cerberus, Chimera, Colchian Dragon, Gorgon, Hydra, Ladon, Nemean Lion, Orthrus, Sphinx (Possibly also: Caucasian Eagle, Phaea, Scylla) Who is Echidna? Echidna is a guardian, goddess, monster, or mother of the sprits that are the alternative to the Olympians, dependent on the sourceRead MorePoor Parenting Revealed in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein Essay1090 Words   |  5 Pagesbeings or live a normal life. The fact that his creation was not given a name is another significant example of Victor’s indifference for his â€Å"child†.   â€Å"The absence of a name denies a child the knowledge of his origin and familial connection.† (Defrain 21)   Not only does the monster lack a name and place in society, but he never experienced motherly-love and tenderness upon his birth, which is crucial to the healthy growth and development of any new being.   Frankenstein describes the â€Å"birth†Read MoreThe Harbinger Of A Category Crisis1157 Words   |  5 Pagesrealm beyond human capability by using a power only known to God. This novel leaves readers with a dilemma that makes them question who in fact is really the monster of this story, the creature he created or Victor himself. According to Jeffrey Jerome Cohen’s â€Å"Seven Monster Theses†, Frankenstein may actually be the embodiment of the monster of his third thesis in this story. The reasons Victor may conform to being the â€Å"Harbinger of a Category Crisis† is because of his seclusion from his family andRead MoreEssay on Perception in Mary Shelly ´s Frankenstein828 Words   |  4 PagesShelly’s Frankenstein, perception plays a key part in the monsters’ icy demise. Not only is the story affected by how the villagers perceive the monster, but the readers’ perception, like in any literary work, plays the role of ultimate judg e. Most responses to Frankenstein are derived directly from pop culture.The green dude with bolts, right? or Oh yeah†¦ I love Frankenberry cereal! Soon, they’ll realize that Frankenstein is not the monster, but actually the name of the creator; and althoughRead MoreThe Between The Monster Grendel And The Old Testament1064 Words   |  5 PagesAllusions to the Books Genesis and Wisdom: The interconnection between the monster Grendel and the Old Testament Beowulf displays Christian influences in the description of Grendel especially through the allusion to the Old Testament. Initially, Grendel is presented as a monster that simply kills without any justification in why he decides to act in such fashion. However, as one alludes to the Old Testament specifically to the Book Genesis and the Book Wisdom, the reasoning behind Grendel’s actionsRead MoreThe Romantic And Victorian Eras Of English History1679 Words   |  7 Pagescultures and societies across the globe have utilized monsters and creature to illustrate anxieties and fears that they possess. The same can be said for works of literature and art. These authors use these anxieties, personify them, and use them to exaggerate the fears of the readers. In short, the monsters/creatures that are developed in each literary era render and personify the biggest anxieties and viewpoints of the society that shaped the monster/creature In the case of the Victorian/Romantic eraRead Mor eUnderstanding Mythological Monsters Essay1669 Words   |  7 PagesMonsters are towering, fierce beings best known for causing nightmares and battling heroes. Tales are told of their devastating power, but also of their agonizing defeats. Monsters are symbols of the inherent evil of human nature and of the dark truths of the natural world. Monsters are also challenges, tasks a hero must complete. Sometimes monsters are the ultimate measure of a hero’s worth, other times just another step in a hero’s journey. In the book Bulfinch’s Mythology, Thomas Bulfinch writesRead MoreThe Victorian Era1706 Words   |  7 PagesThroughout history, cultures and societies across the globe have used monsters or any sort of creature to exemplify anxieties and fears that they have. The same can be said for works of literature and art. These authors use these anxieties, personify them, and use them to exaggerate the fears of the readers. In short, the monsters/creatures that a re created in each literary era depict and personify the biggest fears and viewpoints of the society that it was written in. In the case of the Victorian/Romantic

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Charles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution - 984 Words

Charles Robert Darwin was a British man who became one of the greatest contributors to the study of evolution. He was a naturalist who was able to develop a theory of evolution based on biological changes that he witnessed occurring in varieties of samples on his travels all around the world. Charles Darwin is valuable in science history, simply because he was the first geologists who had come the closest for closing the gap on how and why biological changes occurred. The naturalist and geologist Charles Darwin, was born in the 1800’s and raised in a small town of England named Shrewsbury. He lived in that town for most of his young life until he became the age of 16. Young Darwin had an advantage of being a child who never saw struggle ever in his life for he came from a long line of wealthy scientists in his family. Just like any other young child Charles was full of adventures who had loved the outdoors and was fascinated with playing with all kinds of animals and small insects. As young Darwin got older at the age of 16 his father, Dr. R.W. Darwin noticed that his son hadn’t come to him with any interest in a career for himself so he took it upon himself and sent young Darwin off to medical school to become a doctor in hopes to follow in his footsteps. On October 1825 at the age of 16 Darwin was a student enrolled at the University of Edinburgh to study to become a doctor. Unfortunately, Darwin quickly discovered he was terrified of the slightest sight of blood, so heShow MoreRelatedCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution801 Words   |  4 PagesThe theory of Evolution is one of the greatest intellectual revolutions of human history. It can drastically change our perception of the world and our place in it. Charles Darwin created a coherent theory of evolution and amassed a great body of evidence in support of this theory. During this time, most scientists fully believed that each organism and adaptation was the work of the creator. A fellow scientist Carl Linnaeus created a system of classifications that we still use today. Charles RobertRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory On Evolution Essay1074 Words   |  5 Pagesand how did life start, along with the creation of the universe and Earth? Charles Darwin’s theory on evolution, which is called natural selection, is based on the idea of species naturally adapting to their surrounding environment to better the species chances for survival. Creationism, on the other hand, is the belief that the universe and living organisms originate from specific acts of divine creation. Both are theories on life, and how such life came to be thing we all know. It is not the strongestRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution1750 Words   |  7 PagesCharles Darwin is remembered for his theory of evolution. Much controversy surrounds Darwin s theory. Questions abound. Is evolution a four billion year old process, creating life forms primarily at random but each shaped by an ever-changing and complex environment, that has resulted in all of the wondrous life forms that surround us? Or are all of those beautiful elements of our nature, along with the vastness and majesty of the entire universe, a creation of an intellect of vast intelligence andRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution1055 Words   |  5 Pages Charles Darwin was an English naturalist and geologist, he was known greater for his contributions for the evolution theory. Darwin wrote a book in 1859 it was published and became the greatest and well known book. The name of the book was â€Å"On the Origin of Species†. In the book he wrote about his theory of evolution by natural selection, he discovered how the process of how organisms change as time goes on. Changes in traits and the organism’s physical behavior. Darwin believe change happensRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution951 Words   |  4 Pagesmore vigorously than in America’s public school science classrooms. Of particular concern for school administrators and the educators whom they supervise, are the repeated efforts of Christian fundamentalists to replace the teaching of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection with Biblical Creationism. During the past ninety years, many legal cases have further defined the bo undary of that wall of separation. In response, the methods employed by the proponents of Biblical CreationismRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution1737 Words   |  7 PagesThe theory of evolution is one of the great intellectual revolutions of human history, drastically changing our perception of the world and of our place in it. Charles Darwin put forth a coherent theory of evolution and amassed a great body of evidence in support of this theory. In Darwin s time, most scientists fully believed that each organism and each adaptation was the work of the creator. Linneaus established the system of biological classification that we use today, and did so in the spiritRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution1957 Words   |  8 Pagesdiscusses the theory of evolution in detail. Topics this paper will address include defining the theory of evolution and explaining how the theory has evolved over time, as well as highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the theory and e xamining how effective the theory is in today’s world. I. Description of the theory The theory of evolution sets forth an explanation of how all of the living species on Earth came to be. The theory as we know it today, written by Charles Darwin, states thatRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution2319 Words   |  10 PagesCharles Darwin is commonly known for writing On the Origin of Species, published in 1859. Based on his findings, Darwin concluded to â€Å"the theory of evolution, [by which] is the process of which organisms change over time as a result of changes in heritable or behavioral traits† (Than, 2015). Certain changes that occurred in the organism s’ environment allowed it to evolve, survive, and produce offspring with those developed traits. He recorded his findings while aboard the second voyage of H.M.SRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution Essay2312 Words   |  10 Pages Darwin and his Followers Charles Darwin is one of the most well known names in the United States for good reason. His theory of evolution through natural selection was not only revolutionary in the scientific world, but were also applied to society by some of his followers in this country. Some of these applications were beneficial to society while others simply allowed people to use his teachings for their own goals. While not apparent at first, Darwin does believe in a meaning in life similarRead MoreCharles Darwin s Theory Of Evolution1714 Words   |  7 Pagesâ€Å"Survival of the fittest† is one of the greatest concepts discussed by Charles Darwin (who is known as the father of evolution) and which has also affected many species throughout the world over the years, including us! As presented in his theory of evolution, Charles Darwin explains how those with advantageous traits will be able to better survive than their fellow counterparts. In other words, organisms with traits best suited for their environment will have higher chances of surviving than those

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Things Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe - 881 Words

Chinua Achebe has stated that he wrote his novel Things Fall Apart in response to Conrad’s novella, Heart of Darkness, which appears, at face value, a piece of literature that demonstrates the horrors of imperialism. However, when compared with a novel such as Things Fall Apart, the novella’s numerous faults become glaringly obvious. It is effortless to construe why Achebe would write such a novel when Conrad’s novella did not recognize the people of Africa as people, rather casualties and never sought to understand or assist them. Achebe corrects the errors made in the Heart of Darkness by delving in his book into the lives, customs, and traditions of the natives allowing them to be seen as people. He also responds to Conrad through the way he writes and targets the book, along with how he demonstrates the ideas of the imperialist and Christians in Things Fall Apart. Achebe takes the reader on a journey through an African native’s life, Okonkwo, and as t he reader learns more about the complexity of the character the reader also learns about the intricacy’s and complexities of the lives of all the natives. The Africans that Conrad shows are referred to objectively, while the protagonist in the Heart of Darkness, Marlow, may feel apologetic for the mistreatment of the Africans he does nothing to stop their mistreatment. He even looks down on them just as the imperialist that the novella is attempting to speak against doing. They are referred to as â€Å"cannibals† (Conrad 104)Show MoreRelatedThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe1415 Words   |  6 Pagesbook Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe does just that. This book should be taught in schools because it shows the values and traditions of Achebe’s Igbo culture, persistently teaches life lessons throughout the book, and shows the darker reality of European colonialism in Africa. Chinua Achebe is known as one of the most influential and famous authors to ever write. Chinua Achebe originates from an Igbo background and he expresses that through his writings very well including Things Fall ApartRead MoreThings Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe1324 Words   |  6 Pages Chinua Achebe chose to write his novels in English to reveal a deep response of his people to colonisation and to make that response understood to people all over the world. Things Fall Apart was written in English to teach people worldwide of the struggles he faced and the people of Nigeria faced growing up. Many authors and critics have written about Achebe’s ‘Things fall apart’ adding their valued opinion on what he was trying to say and his decision to write in English. In the followingRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe Essay1203 Words   |  5 Pages who took their land for monetary gain. This was a dark period of time for Africans that live there. The U.S. Civil War and The Great Depression both can be related, in this instance, to how down their people were because of what happened. Chinua Achebe said it best, â€Å"I would be quite satisfied if my novels...did no more than teach my readers of their past...was not a long night of savagery from which the first European acting on God’s behalf delivered them†(qtd. in â€Å"Morning Yet† 45). In theRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe1452 Words   |  6 Pagesassume control over the Roman Empire. However, imperialism in Africa remained a recorded element from 1750 to 1945. This paper visits how control and changes were influences over the Africans during this time period as seen through Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart. (UKEssays, 2015) Europe was experiencing a few financial and political changes that forced the major European forces to investigate abroad regions to add to their resources during the seventeenth century. In order for the EuropeanRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe2361 Words   |  10 PagesThings Fall Apart Book Critique Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is a historical fiction novel describing the life of Okonkwo in a Nigerian village succumbing to European ways, in order to portray Achebe’s view on imperialism. It was chosen for us to read by our teacher because it describes imperialism and its effects in an Ibo village of Nigeria. It also shows the treatment of natives by the Europeans and how the natives reacted. Things Fall Apart is useful to our course of studies because itRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe1265 Words   |  6 PagesThings Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is markedly relevant to our current course of studies in World History, as it tells a story based on European Imperialism in Africa. Coming off the heels of our Imperialism unit, this post-colonial novel provides very helpful context on different civilizations’ perspectives throughout the Age of Imperialism; aside from analyzing death tolls, descriptions of conflicts, and names of countries, it was previousl y hard to envision what life was actually like during thatRead MoreThings Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe 735 Words   |  3 PagesThings fall apart. Achebe. Ernest Gaines once said, â€Å"I write to try to find out who I am. One of my main themes is manliness. I think Im trying to figure out what manliness really is.† Indeed, every society or culture has its own understanding of an ideal man. Even though these characteristics are different in various parts of the world, the significance of masculinity can never be overestimated. â€Å"Things Fall Apart† by Chinua Achebe is considered as one of the best examples of a riseRead MoreThings Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe692 Words   |  3 Pagesthe way to go. Through commercial trading Islam spread into Igboland, and this led to more Igbo people leaving the Igbo way of life for another, whether it be Islam or Christianity which divide the country in two. In the novel Things Fall Apart written by Chinua Achebe British colonialism and the migration of Muslims to Nigeria led to the change in the faith, social and economic changes in the Igbo society. Traditional Igbo faith believes that there is only one creator or god known as ChinekeRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe897 Words   |  4 PagesIn the novel, â€Å"Things Fall Apart† by Chinua Achebe the Igbo tradition revolves around structured gender role. Everything essential of Igbo life is based on their gender, which throughout the novel it shows the role of women and the position they hold, from their role in the family household, also planting women crops, to bearing children. Although the women were claimed to be weaker and seemed to be treated as objects, in the Igbo culture the women still provided qualities that make them worthyRead MoreThings Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe Essay1851 Words   |  8 Pageschoice and styles are critical not only to the reader’s understanding of the text but to his appreciation as well. How language is effectively manipulated in their writings enhances the reader’s valuing of the works. The selected novel Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is a representation of Igbo culture and their language. It explores the life of an Igbo tribe at the time of when colonization hit Africa. It could be considered as a post-colonial text, as the protagonist of the story and the other

The Significance of Architectural Ideas Free Essays

What is the significance of architectural ideas? The question begs the question of which architectural ideas should be considered in the first place. While it may be true that there have been a huge number of architectural ideas since the beginning of human civilization, it is important to limit the question at hand. At the least, what can be done is to appropriately categorize architectural ideas according to their chronology. We will write a custom essay sample on The Significance of Architectural Ideas or any similar topic only for you Order Now In doing so, we are confining ourselves to a more specific and easier task. There is little reason to doubt that earlier architectural ideas have influenced the more contemporary ones. Theories on how buildings are to be designed have long existed, perhaps as early as the time when human beings began to first conceptualize their dwellings and their places for worship and other social activities. For the most part, early civilizations had to consider their needs and means. They had to reflect on building structures for the sake of providing shelter, security and a place of worship. They also had to consider their level of architectural skills and the materials available during the time. These basic considerations for early architectural ideas are significant for the people back then since their needs and means limit what they can design and actually build which, as a consequence, delineate the characteristics of their architectural designs. In his De Architectura, Vitruvius provides one of the few surviving earliest examples of architectural designs. He suggests that good buildings should have three basic characteristics—durability, utility, and beauty (Pellecchia, p. 378). Apparently, these three precepts have remained integral to modern architectural ideas. Thus, it is only fitting to say that these ideas are significant inasmuch as they have set in motion a well-established standard in envisioning the designs of buildings regardless of certain sizes and scopes. More importantly, these foundations for architectural ideas give rise to more complex yet more specific approaches in designing buildings according to the balance between these basic precepts. For instance, an architect may give more preference to utility over beauty without having to abandon the latter completely. Another architect may focus more on the aesthetics of the building without neglecting the durability of the structure. There are other influential architects in earlier times—such as Leon Battista Alberti and Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, among others—but it is sufficient to say that their contributions in terms of architectural ideas can never be denied. However, that is not to say that new architectural ideas have not materialized in more recent years, or that architects are simply confined to the ideas of the earlier generations. For example, the American architect Louis Sullivan who is considered to be the â€Å"father of modernism† once suggested that form follows function (â€Å"Louis Sullivan and the Architecture of Free Enterprise,† p. 42). It has been an overriding force in 20th century architectural designs, influencing architects to take more consideration of the practical use of buildings rather than their aesthetics. The general direction of architecture at that time became more focused on the intended function of buildings, thereby relegating its aesthetic aspects to a lesser degree of importance. Buildings were designed according to how they will serve their purpose, or how they will address the primary intention behind their construction. A museum in New York, for instance, will have to be designed based on how a museum ought to function and not on how the structure will stand visually appealing to its visitors. The â€Å"form follows function† approach stands in direct contrast to the idea prevalent during the 19th century that architectural design should bestow more significance to aesthetics. John Ruskin, for instance, proclaims that a building is not strictly a product of architectural ideas if it is not adorned in certain respects (Bliss, p. 37). Thus, an office building will not only have to serve its purpose. Rather, it will also have to be appealing to the senses of its occupants. The shape of the building will not only have to be sufficient enough in order to accommodate the target number of occupants. It will also have to be ornamented with figures on its topmost floor, or its windows will also have to be visually appealing when viewed from a certain distance. This formidable clash between architectural ideas only signifies the fact that each idea belonging to a certain generation is presumably significant first within that generation and second to the generations which later used that idea as a platform for other architectural ideas. This observation is clearly manifested in the way 19th and 20th century architectural ideas stand in opposite ends. They contradict each other in terms of approach but subsequent generations of architects may have found their own ways to strike a balance between the two. Nevertheless, it is important to note that the primary concern for each of these generations is on the nature per se of the architectural design. In more recent times, the idea that architectural designs should follow the concept of â€Å"sustainability† reflects the notion that these designs should also take into consideration the prevailing social and environmental conditions (Watson, p. 121). Much of what can be called â€Å"sustainable buildings† is designed in such a way that they minimize environmental hazards or that they promote an ecologically friendly environment. This type of architectural idea is significant today since it directly addresses major environmental concerns including the use of natural resources. For example, the use of wind turbines and solar panels in providing electricity to modern buildings can help lessen the demand for electricity derived from coal-powered electric plants. Also, designing buildings with larger glass windows allows for sunlight to penetrate and provide the light, thereby reducing the need for light bulbs during the day. In essence, the approach places great premium on the environmental effects of architectural designs, from lighting fixtures to the materials used in the ornamentation of the structure. With the continuous depletion of the planet’s natural resources and the unending threats to the environment, sustainable architectural designs significantly help in reducing the environmental dangers. If the proper allocation of â€Å"earth-friendly† materials for the aesthetic construction of a building reaches a global scale, there is reason to believe that the present environmental problems will be addressed in the long run with far-reaching benefits. As it can be observed, architectural ideas belonging to certain generations reflect the respective social conditions and aesthetic interpretations in those times. Looking back, the early architectural ideas still have their influence on contemporary designs. Architects still have to consider the durability, utility, and the beauty of the designs of their buildings, without which buildings will be devoid of use, will disintegrate faster and put thousands of lives in grave peril, and will look as though they are sore to the eyes so much so that they fail to inspire those who dwell in them. Architects will also have to reflect on whether or not they have to put form over function, or the other way around, especially with regard to the very intention of why the structure needs to be constructed. Ideas in the field of architecture can truly survive great lengths of time precisely because they remain significant not only for those who lived those ideas during their time but also for those architects today who seek inspiration. One architectural idea may give rise to another. Or an architectural idea being criticized for its preference for function over form may result to yet another idea harmonizing function and form into a single design. At any rate, it can be said that the significance of architectural designs rests on their application. If they hardly apply to any immediate need, they may lose their influence and eventually become mere footnotes in the annals of the history of architecture. How to cite The Significance of Architectural Ideas, Papers

Danny free essay sample

â€Å"How is it that a thirteen year old boy can raise more money than any of our board members?† asked the director of Camp One Step at a Time to open his board meeting. All of the board members were truly in shock at this opener. Did a thirteen year old really raise that much money? Yes, he did. And that thirteen year old boy is my little brother Danny. In the months leading up to his Bar Mitzvah, Danny informed my family that for his Bar Mitzvah project he wanted to raise money for Camp One Step at a Time. This very special camp is a place for terminally ill kids to escape for a week and have a camp experience that many kids take for granted. Because camp has played a huge role in my life as well as Danny’s, we were all very impressed with his decision. We will write a custom essay sample on Danny or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page My parents had previously suggested the idea to him, but never pushed him into doing it. When Danny told me he was really going to follow through with this, of course I was proud of him, but I didn’t think he would really be able to pull it off. Could my little brother really do this? My immediate thought was there was no way Danny could make this happen. Both he and I take a lot of things for granted and we never really work for anything. I wouldn’t say that we are selfish, but we always think about ourselves much more than we think of others. But this would soon change. All on his own, Danny wrote and sent out a letter to all of our family and friends. As people began to receive the letter, our home phone did not stop ringing. Everyone was calling to say how wonderfully personal and inspiring Danny’s letter was. When the phone calls stopped, the donations started to roll in. No matter how big or small they were, Danny gratefully accepted all of them because he knew that every single donation would help his cause. This impressed me because I could see Danny’s selfish tendencies melting away before my eyes. On the day of his Bar Mitzvah after completing his service, Danny read a speech to all of the people in attendance. He explained what the camp was, what the camp meant to him, and thanked everyone for all of their donations. And then he said the words I will never forget. â€Å"With all of your help, I will be able to send three kids to camp this summer!†Everyone, especially me, was in shock. Danny actually pulled this whole project together and made it happen. When I looked at him standing before all of our friends and family, I had never seen him so full of pride in his entire life. Annoying, difficult, and selfish are typical adjectives many use to describe their siblings. These words exemplify the ways my brother and I used to be before his Bar Mitzvah. But from the moment I saw a changed Danny stand before me and tell everyone what he did to help others, I knew I had to change too. Danny’s speech and actions showed me how helping others not only makes the less fortunate feel great, but it makes you yourself feel like a better person. Danny, a normally shy and timid kid, felt so powerful and proud after he turned in all his donations to the camp. Because of what Danny did, I have changed for the better as well. Before Danny’s Bar Mitzvah, I took so many things for granted and I never took the time to think about others less fortunate than I, but because of Danny I have learned the importance of putting others before myself. The annoying, difficult, and selfish person I used to be took a positive change and developed into a more caring, considera te, and thoughtful human being, all in thanks to my little brother’s push in the right direction. Danny free essay sample â€Å"How is it that a thirteen year old boy can raise more money than any of our board members?† asked the director of Camp One Step at a Time to open his board meeting. All of the board members were truly in shock at this opener. Did a thirteen year old really raise that much money? Yes, he did. And that thirteen year old boy is my little brother Danny. In the months leading up to his Bar Mitzvah, Danny informed my family that for his Bar Mitzvah project he wanted to raise money for Camp One Step at a Time. This very special camp is a place for terminally ill kids to escape for a week and have a camp experience that many kids take for granted. Because camp has played a huge role in my life as well as Danny’s, we were all very impressed with his decision. We will write a custom essay sample on Danny or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page My parents had previously suggested the idea to him, but never pushed him into doing it. When Danny told me he was really going to follow through with this, of course I was proud of him, but I didn’t think he would really be able to pull it off. Could my little brother really do this? My immediate thought was there was no way Danny could make this happen. Both he and I take a lot of things for granted and we never really work for anything. I wouldn’t say that we are selfish, but we always think about ourselves much more than we think of others. But this would soon change. All on his own, Danny wrote and sent out a letter to all of our family and friends. As people began to receive the letter, our home phone did not stop ringing. Everyone was calling to say how wonderfully personal and inspiring Danny’s letter was. When the phone calls stopped, the donations started to roll in. No matter how big or small they were, Danny gratefully accepted all of them because he knew that every single donation would help his cause. This impressed me because I could see Danny’s selfish tendencies melting away before my eyes. On the day of his Bar Mitzvah after completing his service, Danny read a speech to all of the people in attendance. He explained what the camp was, what the camp meant to him, and thanked everyone for all of their donations. And then he said the words I will never forget. â€Å"With all of your help, I will be able to send three kids to camp this summer!†Everyone, especially me, was in shock. Danny actually pulled this whole project together and made it happen. When I looked at him standing before all of our friends and family, I had never seen him so full of pride in his entire life. Annoying, difficult, and selfish are typical adjectives many use to describe their siblings. These words exemplify the ways my brother and I used to be before his Bar Mitzvah. But from the moment I saw a changed Danny stand before me and tell everyone what he did to help others, I knew I had to change too. Danny’s speech and actions showed me how helping others not only makes the less fortunate feel great, but it makes you yourself feel like a better person. Danny, a normally shy and timid kid, felt so powerful and proud after he turned in all his donations to the camp. Because of what Danny did, I have changed for the better as well. Before Danny’s Bar Mitzvah, I took so many things for granted and I never took the time to think about others less fortunate than I, but because of Danny I have learned the importance of putting others before myself. The annoying, difficult, and selfish person I used to be took a positive change and developed into a more caring, considera te, and thoughtful human being, all in thanks to my little brother’s push in the right direction.

Monday, April 27, 2020

Insider Essays - Brown Williamson, Films, The Insider,

Insider A dramatization of 1995 events in which the tobacco industry allegedly covered up proof that nicotine is addictive and harmful. When Brown and Williamson executive Jeffrey Wigand (Crowe) tries to expose the industry's cover-up, he is threatened into silence. He eventually gets his story to 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman (AL Pacino), but CBS decides against airing it due to political and economic pressures, and the threat of lawsuit from Brown and Williamson. Before we start, I think it's important that you know a little thing about me, and where I'm coming from. I do smoke. But I believe that most of the lawsuits filed against the tobacco industry are unfounded, desperate attempts for people to put the blame on anyone but themselves. I think social security is a safety net for the financially irresponsible. I thought The Insider was a great movie from a strictly entertainment perspective (don't get ahead of me on this one!), and I enjoyed it very much. Russell Crowe is Jeffrey Wigand, a Brown and Williamson VP of Research and Development whose conscience compels him to blow the whistle on the industry. He claims that Big Tobacco has been covering up scientific research that proves nicotine is addictive and harmful. The writing puts a lot of energy into making sure that Wigand is a sufficiently complicated character, and one that we sympathize with. To be sure, he's not entirely one-dimensional. Initially, he does what most of us would do in his position: he takes the money and benefits that the company offers him in return for silence. After all, the guy has a family to look out for. But then Wigand is tortured over his passiveness, wondering if he should take a more aggressive stance with his potentially damaging knowledge. 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman, sensing a big story in the works, tries to coax Wigand into talking. An energetic Al Pacino, who fights to get the story on the air, only to have it snuffed by CBS, plays Bergman here. Allegedly, the television network was possibly up for sale around the time of this story, and airing it might have damaged their image with controversy, making it less appealing to potential suitors. This, coupled with the threat of lawsuit from Brown and Williamson, made CBS refuse to air the story. The Insider portrays these events as a crusade on the part of Bergman and Wigand to get the truth out there, against the will of Big Business and Bigger Tobacco. And while Bergman is never portrayed as much more than a journalist with an uncharacteristic amount of integrity, Wigand is a great character to follow as he tries to balance out everything around him. Tortured and sleepless, his reactions are what you would expect from someone forced to choose between the safety of his family with the gravity of what he knows. Most of it makes for edge of your suit viewing. Suspense abounds, and AL Pacino's confrontations with the "evil" corporate executives, censors, and whatnot are the centerpiece of the movie. He gets to climb up on the soapbox and belt out a few speeches about truth and justice and freedom and right and wrong and all that other fun stuff. It's tense, and it's really quite fascinating, actually. From a dramatic standpoint, this movie couldn't have asked for better performances. Gina Gershon makes an appearance in the movie as a tough, icy corporate attorney for CBS. As a standard caricature of faceless law more interested in money than people, she's fabulous. The Insider runs at over two and half hours, but always remains interesting and never drags. The biggest issue I have with this movie is how it so comfortably passes itself off as an unbiased, historical representation of what happened between real life executive Jeffrey Wigand, real life producer Lowell Bergman, and real life corporation Brown and Williamson. The problem is that the movie is so well crafted and so interesting that it's very easy to accept it as 100% Grade A Truth. However, this is clearly Wigand's story, and closer inspection would reveal that the main characters here are just a little too perfect to be real. Did Bergman really storm into the offices of CBS and rant and rave the way AL Pacino does in this movie? Some words might have been exchanged, but it's hard to believe anything as dramatic as what's depicted in The Insider could have happened for real. They would have likely said, "Okay, calm down, have a cup of coffee, have